More Magister K. on pseudonymity:

…I always have a poetic relationship to my works, and therefore I am pseudonymous…

…To be an author is to be in a fraternity and is just as cluttered up with finiteness as anything else. Authors are supposed to be of mutual help to each other, criticize each other’s writings, talk about what one is going to do, etc. Your intimate friends in particular are supposed to profit from the relationship and have little scraps of news to run around with: “that they personally saw the manuscript, heard part of it, talked with the author, etc.”  By taking advantage of my pseudonymity, I have stayed completely clear of this. In the finite sense I have thereby done irreparable damage to myself, have offended people, have shirked the salutary tradition of small talk, and have given my whole enterprise the appearance of chance and caprice…

…how many are there, after all, who have any intimation of how prose can be used lyrically and of (what I am committed to) how prose can produce a stronger lyrical effect than verse if people would only learn how to read and to insist on thought in every word…

…As long as I was pseudonymous, both the idea of the production and the illusion of the production required that I act outwardly as I did; it was absolutely important to me to do everything to support the illusion that I was not an author. The fact that people nevertheless did regard me as author does not concern me; men are like that and have no aptitude for ideas except for playing havoc with them; but among other things my idea is that this ought not to interfere. —But from the moment I assumed the authorship, decorum required that I appear less. All this trouble is of some good in that it helps me to behave in that way. The whole pseudonymous production and my life in relation to it was in the Greek mode…

Quote

(scribbled in the margins)

… it presumably is well understood, now when the one thing needful, indispensable, can be named in a single word: government.
… it does indeed look as if everything were politics, but it will no doubt appear that the catastrophe corresponds inversely to the Reformation: then everything appeared to be a religious movement and became politics: now everything appears to be politics but will become a religious movement.
… This is expressed (just to mention one pseudonym), but of course in character, therefore humorously, in Johannes Climacus’s standing motto: ‘Better well hung than ill wed,’ which he himself comments upon, saying: Better well hung than by an unfortunate marriage to be brought into systematic affinities with all the world.

Søren Kierkegaard’s Journals and Papers, #6255, Vol. 6,  page 59